INTERNAL COMMUNICATION GUIDELINES

INTERNAL COMMUNICATION GUIDELINES

The following policy guidelines are provided for improving internal communication and minimising conflict at Global Star Enterprises (GSE).

Misunderstandings and communication problems are one of the most common sources of workplace frustration. Conflict is inevitable, but it need not ruin your workday or cause unbearable stress.

Try these conflict resolution tips to make your work environment at GSE a less stressful and a more productive workplace.

  1. Be specific in formulating your complaints. Saying “I’m never invited to meetings”, is not as effective as saying, “I wish I had been invited to last Thursday’s production meeting.”
  1. Try not to involve yourself in conflicts that do not directly involve you or your responsibilities. Even if someone has clearly been wronged, allow him or her to resolve the situation.
  1. Try to depersonalise conflicts. Instead of a “me versus you” mentality, frame the situation as “us versus the problem”.
  1. In a situation where conflict does arise, try an exercise in listening. Before explaining your own position, try to paraphrase what the other is saying in one or two sentences. Start with, “so you’re saying that…” and see how much you really understand about their position. You may find that you’re on the same wavelength but having problems communicating your ideas.
  1. Avoid involving your manager in conflict resolution unless all other avenues have been pursued. Instead, take the mature approach of accepting responsibility for working with the other person and resolving your differences.
  1. If an extended discussion is necessary, agree first on a time and place to talk. Confronting a co-worker who is with a client or working on a deadline is unfair and unprofessional. Pick a time when you are both free to concentrate on the issue.
  1. Take it outside. Don’t try to hold negotiations in a place where other staff can hear every word.
  1. Limit your complaints to those directly involved in the workplace conflict. Character assassination is unwarranted. Remember, you need to preserve a working relationship rather than a personal one, and your opinion of a co-worker’s character is generally irrelevant.
  1. Recognise harassment. If conflict arises out of sexual, racial, or ethnic issues, or inappropriate behaviour, it is more than conflict, it is harassment. Take appropriate action and discuss the problem with your manager or the human resources department.
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